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The United States faces a growing terrorism problem that will likely worsen over the next year, including in the aftermath of the November 2020 presidential election. The most significant threat likely comes from white supremacists, though anarchists and religious extremists inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaeda could present a potential threat as well. Drawing from a new data set of nearly 900 domestic terrorist attacks and plots since 1994, the Transnational Threats Project (TNT) at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) in Washington, DC, examined the comparative threat from different extremist ideologies; trends in attacks, fatalities, targets, and weapons; and implications for counterterrorism efforts. Catrina Doxsee, program manager and research associate for TNT, will present her team’s findings and describe the major extremist networks operating in the United States.

Catrina Doxsee is a program manager and research associate for the Transnational Threats Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), where she analyzes global terrorist activity and the irregular activities of countries such as Russia and Iran. Prior to joining CSIS, she worked as an associate policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute. Ms. Doxsee has also conducted research at the U.S. Treasury Department’s Middle East and North Africa Office and the Philip Merrill Center for Strategic Studies at Johns Hopkins. She previously served for two years in AmeriCorps as a refugee resettlement caseworker in Pittsburgh, PA. Ms. Doxsee holds a B.A. in history, with a concentration in military history, from the University of Chicago and an M.A. in strategic studies and international economics from the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS).

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